If law enforcement stops you on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, you may quickly acquire first-hand knowledge of DWI penalties.

In the state of New York, the penalties result in part from Leandra’s Law and the requirement for an ignition interlock device.

About Leandra’s Law

Leandra Rosado was an 11-year-old who died because she was a passenger in a car operated by an intoxicated driver. In her honor, the state of New York enacted Leandra’s Law in 2009. As a result of this law, the court requires the installation of an ignition interlock device in a vehicle driven by anyone convicted of DWI. “Interlock restriction” will also appear on his or her driver’s license.

The IID explained

The ignition interlock device is roughly the size of a mobile phone and basically consists of a mouthpiece and a computer that measures blood alcohol levels. If the court orders you to have an IID, you must ensure installation occurs within 10 days, and you are responsible for all costs associated with leasing and maintaining the device. The IID connects to the ignition system in your car. When you blow into the mouthpiece, the computer measures your blood alcohol content level. If your BAC registers 0.025% or higher, your vehicle will not start.

Test questions

Facing a DWI conviction is an unnerving experience but remember that your arrest will raise questions about the possibility of errors. In building a successful defense, those questions might include how law enforcement handled your roadside or breath tests or even whether the officer had probable cause to arrest you. Will Leandra’s Law have an effect on your life? You have a right to expect the best possible outcome for your case.